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Binary Addition

Binary addition follows the same rules as addition in the decimal system except that rather than carrying a 1 over when the values added equal 10, carry over occurs when the result of addition equals 2. Refer to the example below for clarification.
Note that in the binary system:
0 + 0 = 0
0 + 1 = 1
1 + 0 = 1
1 + 1 = 0, carry over the 1, i.e. 10
The only real difference between binary and decimal addition is that the value 2 in the binary system is the equivalent of 10 in the decimal system. Note that the superscripted 1's represent digits that are carried over. A common mistake to watch out for when conducting binary addition is in the case where 1 + 1 = 0 also has a 1 carried over from the previous column to its right. The value at the bottom should then be 1 from the carried over 1 rather than 0.


Binary Subtraction

Similarly to binary addition, there is little difference between binary and decimal subtraction except those that arise from using only the digits 0 and 1. Borrowing occurs in any instance where the number that is subtracted is larger than the number it is being subtracted from. In binary subtraction, the only case where borrowing is necessary is when 1 is subtracted from 0. When this occurs, the 0 in the borrowing column essentially becomes "2" (changing the 0-1 into 2-1 = 1) while reducing the 1 in the column being borrowed from by 1. If the following column is also 0, borrowing will have to occur from each subsequent column until a column with a value of 1 can be reduced to 0.
0 - 0 = 0
0 - 1 = 1, borrow 1, resulting in -1 carried over
1 - 0 = 1
1 - 1 = 0


Binary Multiplication

Binary multiplication is arguably simpler than its decimal counterpart. Since the only values used are 0 and 1, the results that must be added are either the same as the first term, or 0. Note that in each subsequent row, placeholder 0's need to be added, and the value shifted to the left, just like in decimal multiplication. The complexity in binary multiplication arises from tedious binary addition dependent on how many bits are in each term.
0 × 0 = 0
0 × 1 = 0
1 × 0 = 0
1 × 1 = 1


Binary Division

The process of binary division is similar to long division in the decimal system. The dividend is still divided by the divisor in the same manner, with the only significant difference being the use of binary rather than decimal subtraction. Note that a good understanding of binary subtraction is important for conducting binary division. Refer to the example below, as well as to the binary subtraction section for clarification.



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